Hungry

27 - 28 July 2017

KS Brewer, Jeremy Penn

Fat Free Art presents HUNGRY, a special two-day only exhibition that will transform Fat Free’s gallery into a visceral multimedia experience that explores the complexities of desire.

Video artist Kelsey S Brewer presents a new body of films accompanied by sculptural works and an opening night performance piece. Acclaimed New York artist Jeremy Penn joins her with mirrors, text and vintage erotica to create a sense of interactivity within the immersive environment; the collective effect is a powerfully seductive show.

Desire for the unattainable propels the show, creating a tense, erotic atmosphere that’s equal parts pleasurable and painful. The visceral sound and imagery of the films is paired with a feeling of mounting tension, drawing viewers into the subject’s experience. From this vantage point, the deeper issues at play are exposed - desperate frustration with societal judgment, censorship, and control are answered by an equally urgent desire for freedom and release. The inherent voyeurism of viewership is literally mirrored and put under a lens in order to reveal our simultaneous status as observers and the observed. HUNGRY offers a raw, honest portrayal of our desperate emotional, sexual, social and cultural hunger for something we may never have.

HUNGRY opens July 27th with a live performance by conceptual artist Ventiko and runs through the 28th . In conjunction with the exhibition Kelsey S Brewer will host HI CALORIE, an intimate screening event at her studio (The 1896) with questions answered by the artist. For more information, visit www.kelseysbrewer.com.

Kelsey S Brewer (b. 1992) is a multimedia video artist living and working in Brooklyn. She studied film at NYU Tisch, and has since exhibited her work across the country with honors from festivals and organizations. She incorporates aspects of other art forms, such as painting and sculpture, into her video work in order to create visceral, emotive moving images that push the boundaries what film is perceived to be.